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Ian Wilson
Ian Wilson

Where To Buy Anchor New Zealand Cheddar Cheese



Cheddar is a fantastic cheese for both flavour and functionality. Our Anchor cheddar has a light and creamy cheese flavour and a smooth buttery texture that makes it ideal in almost any cooking or snacking application. Anchor cheddar is made in New Zealand from the fresh milk of cows that are pasture grazed year-round.




where to buy anchor new zealand cheddar cheese



For our vegetarian consumers, Anchor has created a delicious vegetarian cheddar made without calf rennet. Cheddar is a fantastic cheese for both flavour and functionality. Our Anchor vegetarian cheddar has a light and creamy cheese flavour and a smooth buttery texture that makes it ideal in almost any cooking or snacking application. Anchor vegetarian cheddar is made in New Zealand from the fresh milk of cows that are pasture grazed year-round.


Anchor Processed Cheddar is a fantastic cheese for both flavour and versatility, with a longer shelf-life than natural cheddar. This processed cheddar is sliced and individually wrapped. It has a smooth and mild cheddar flavour with a tender, elastic body. Anchor processed cheddar slices are made in New Zealand from the fresh milk of cows that are pasture grazed year-round.


Anchor Lite Processed Cheese is a smooth, mild cheddar with reduced fat. It has a tender, elastic body, and is a fantastic cheese for both taste and versatility. Anchor Lite Processed Cheese is sliced and Individually wrapped for convenience, and has a longer shelf-life than natural cheddar. It is made in New Zealand from the fresh milk of cows that are pasture grazed year-round.


Anchor Protein + Hi-Calcium Processed Cheese has reduced fat, and is a smooth mild to medium cheddar cheese. It is fantastic for both taste and versatility, with a tender, elastic body. It has a longer shelf-life than natural cheddar, and is sliced and individually


Anchor Hi-Calcium Processed Cheese has reduced fat, and is a smooth mild to medium cheddar cheese. It is fantastic for both taste and versatility, with a tender, elastic body. It has a longer shelf-life than natural cheddar, and is sliced and individually wrapped for convenience. Anchor Hi-Calcium Processed Cheese


The biggest difference right off the bat is the color. A lot of American made cheddar cheese is yellow/orange. For some reason - I will get to that a moment - we feel the need to add coloring to our cheese that isn't naturally there. I have heard cheesemakers around the world mocking us for that - and probably rightfully so.


New Zealand cheddar is light yellow cheese. This is because it comes from cow that are grass fed. The milk picks up the beta carotene from the cow's diet. If the cows are fed most grains then the milk they produce will not have that coloring in it.


If you want to know if you have good quality New Zealand cheddar in your hands, look for a yellowish color. This indicated the cheese was made with quality milk, from grass-fed cows. Don't be shy to ask for a sample whenever you are shopping.


Cheddar cheese (or simply cheddar) is a natural cheese that is relatively hard, off-white (or orange if colourings such as annatto are added), and sometimes sharp-tasting. Cheddar originates from the English village of Cheddar in Somerset.[1]


Cheddar cheese is produced all over the world, and cheddar cheese has no protected designation of origin either in the United Kingdom or the European Union. In 2007, the protected designation of origin name "West Country Farmhouse Cheddar" was registered in the EU and (after Brexit) the UK, defined as cheddar produced from local milk within Somerset, Dorset, Devon and Cornwall and manufactured using traditional methods.[2][3] Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) was registered for Orkney Scottish Island Cheddar in 2013 in the EU,[4] which also applies under UK law. Globally, the style and quality of cheeses labelled as cheddar may vary greatly, with some processed cheeses being packaged as "cheddar". Furthermore, certain cheeses that are similar in taste and appearance to Red Leicester are sometimes marketed as "red cheddar".


Cheddar is the most popular cheese in the UK, accounting for 51% of the country's 1.9 billion annual cheese market.[5] It is the second-most popular cheese in the US behind mozzarella, with an average annual consumption of 10 lb (4.5 kg) per capita.[6] The US produced approximately 3,000,000,000 lb (1,300,000 long tons; 1,400,000 tonnes) of cheddar cheese in 2014,[7] and the UK produced 258,000 long tons (262,000 tonnes) in 2008.[8]


Nineteenth-century Somerset dairyman Joseph Harding was central to the modernisation and standardisation of cheddar.[9] For his technical innovations, promotion of dairy hygiene, and volunteer dissemination of modern cheese-making techniques, Harding has been dubbed "the father of cheddar".[10] Harding introduced new equipment to the process of cheese-making, including his "revolving breaker" for curd cutting; the revolving breaker saved much manual effort in the cheese-making process.[11][12] The "Joseph Harding method" was the first modern system for cheddar production based upon scientific principles. Harding stated that cheddar cheese is "not made in the field, nor in the byre, nor even in the cow, it is made in the dairy".[9] Together, Joseph Harding and his wife were behind the introduction of the cheese into Scotland and North America, while his sons Henry and William Harding were responsible for introducing cheddar cheese production to Australia[13] and facilitating the establishment of the cheese industry in New Zealand, respectively.


During the Second World War and for nearly a decade thereafter, most of the milk in Britain was used to make a single kind of cheese nicknamed "government cheddar" as part of the war economy and rationing.[14] As a result, almost all other cheese production in the country was wiped out. Before the First World War, more than 3,500 cheese producers were in Britain; fewer than 100 remained after the Second World War.[15]


During the manufacture of cheddar, the curds and whey are separated using rennet, an enzyme complex normally produced from the stomachs of newborn calves (in vegetarian or kosher cheeses, bacterial, yeast or mould-derived chymosin is used).[17][18]


"Cheddaring" refers to an additional step in the production of cheddar cheese where, after heating, the curd is kneaded with salt, cut into cubes to drain the whey, and then stacked and turned.[17] Strong, extra-mature cheddar, sometimes called vintage, needs to be matured for 15 months or more. The cheese is kept at a constant temperature, often requiring special facilities. As with other hard cheese varieties produced worldwide, caves provide an ideal environment for maturing cheese; still, today, some cheddar is matured in the caves at Wookey Hole and Cheddar Gorge. Additionally, some versions of cheddar are smoked.[19][20]


Cheddar can be a deep to pale yellow (off-white) colour, or a yellow-orange colour when certain plant extracts are added, such as beet juice. One commonly used spice is annatto, extracted from seeds of the tropical achiote tree. Originally added to simulate the colour of high-quality milk from grass-fed Jersey and Guernsey cows,[24] annatto may also impart a sweet, nutty flavour. The largest producer of cheddar cheese in the United States, Kraft, uses a combination of annatto and oleoresin paprika, an extract of the lipophilic (oily) portion of paprika.[25]


The Slow Food Movement has created a cheddar presidium,[27] arguing that only three cheeses should be called "original cheddar". Their specifications, which go further than the "West Country Farmhouse Cheddar" PDO, require that cheddar be made in Somerset and with traditional methods, such as using raw milk, traditional animal rennet, and a cloth wrapping.[28]


The "cheddar cheese" name is used internationally; its name does not have a protected designation of origin, but the use of the name "West Country Farmhouse Cheddar" does. In addition to the United Kingdom, cheddar is also made in Australia, Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, Finland, Uruguay and the United States. Cheddars can be either industrial or artisan cheeses. The flavour, colour, and quality of industrial cheese varies significantly, and food packaging will usually indicate a strength, such as mild, medium, strong, tasty, sharp, extra sharp, mature, old, or vintage; this may indicate the maturation period, or food additives used to enhance the flavour. Artisan varieties develop strong and diverse flavours over time.[citation needed]


As of 2013, cheddar accounts for over 55% of the Australian cheese market, with average annual consumption around 7.5 kg (17 lb) per person.[29] Cheddar is so commonly found that the name is rarely used: instead, cheddar is sold by strength alone as e.g. "mild", "tasty" or "sharp".[30]


Most of the cheddar produced in New Zealand is factory-made, although some are handmade by artisan cheesemakers. Factory-made cheddar is generally sold relatively young within New Zealand, but the Anchor dairy company ships New Zealand cheddars to the UK, where the blocks mature for another year or so.[36]


Only one producer of the cheese is now based in the village of Cheddar, the Cheddar Gorge Cheese Co.[37] The name "cheddar" is not protected under European Union or UK law, though the name "West Country Farmhouse Cheddar" has an EU and (following Brexit) a UK protected designation of origin (PDO) registration, and may only be produced in Somerset, Devon, Dorset and Cornwall, using milk sourced from those counties.[38] Cheddar is usually sold as mild, medium, mature, extra mature or vintage. Cheddar produced in Orkney is registered as an EU protected geographical indication under the name "Orkney Scottish Island Cheddar".[39] This protection highlights the use of traditional methods, passed down through generations since 1946 and its uniqueness in comparison to other cheddar cheeses.[40] "West Country Farmhouse Cheddar" is protected outside the UK and the EU as a Geographical Indication also in China, Georgia, Iceland, Japan, Moldova, Montenegro, Norway, Serbia, Switzerland and Ukraine.[41] 041b061a72


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